Platform

Each year the Fair’s curated section Platform, features invited galleries presenting well-known, overlooked and emerging artists whose work aligns to a single distinct theme.

MUSIC AND ITS PART IN CONTEMPORARY VISUAL ART

In 2022 Platform explored the theme of Music and its Part in Contemporary Visual Art.

Curator Candida Stevens worked with 9 galleries whose artists have created new work exploring the intersection of visual art and music, and the ways in which contemporary art can incorporate aspects of movement and rhythm.

The display ranged from abstract work referencing the riff of jazz music with off-key colour and off-kilter form to figurative artists representing the process of composition across both art forms.

Tom Farthing, Variations II [Detail], 2021. Courtesy Zimmer Stewart Gallery
Tom Farthing, Variations II [Detail], 2021. Courtesy Zimmer Stewart Gallery
John Creed, Beethoven’s Notable Hooks, 2021. Courtesy of Contemporary Applied Arts
John Creed, Beethoven’s Notable Hooks, 2021. Courtesy of Contemporary Applied Arts
Ben Crase, Can't Stop the Night, 2021. Courtesy of Otomys Art Gallery 
Ben Crase, Can't Stop the Night, 2021. Courtesy of Otomys Art Gallery 

Music has been inextricably linked to the fashions, expressions and entertainment of mankind since the beginning of time. Music and fine art have borrowed from each other for centuries through a combination of pure inspiration, collaborations and appropriation. Visual art and music are allied in the way their movements are titled and they share terms, like mood, tone, composition. Importantly they share a purpose, to inspire and provoke, both our minds and our mood.

We see music as a significant influence in the history of art. Gustav Klimt praised Schubert, Arnold Schoenberg was inspired by Wassily Kandinsky’s abstract forms, and Morton Feldman worked closely with Mark Rothko. It is affiliated with the rise of modernism and is an inseparable factor in the rise of Pop.

There is plenty of evidence that music and visual art have a long-standing connection and mutual endorsement, which is unsurprising. Across art forms and materials, artists working in various styles refer to the movement, rhythm and other elements of music. Even when visual art and music do not overtly influence one another, they can share abstract qualities without having direct communication. Visual art and music share common cultural influences, including societal, political and technological.

With contemporary craft and contemporary art increasingly occupying a shared space in both exhibitions and collections, Platform 2022 looked at the range of music inspiring visual art being made today.

Monica Fierro, "How to Listen to a Concert", 2021. Courtesy of jaggedart
Andy Burgess, Moulin Rouge, 2018. Courtesy of Cynthia Corbett Gallery
Andy Burgess, Moulin Rouge, 2018. Courtesy of Cynthia Corbett Gallery
David Bowie, Tony Beaver, 2021. Courtesy of Cavaliero Finn Gallery
David Bowie, Tony Beaver, 2021. Courtesy of Cavaliero Finn Gallery

On display from Candida Stevens Gallery was Vanessa Jackson RA, whose recent street art project UpTownDancing took over London’s Piccadilly, as well as Ostinato, a series of 23 new unique woodcuts by Celia Cook.

Australian gallery Otomys showcased new works by the American painter Ben Crase, and Zimmer Stewart presented a solo exhibition of paintings and etchings by Tom Farthing themed around fairgrounds.

Cynthia Corbett Gallery presented works from Matt Smith’s recent porcelain sculpture project Notes of a Love Song, and Andy Burgess’ vintage inspired and historic ephemera collages.

Candida Stevens, photographed by Dan Stevens

London Art Fair was thrilled to welcome back Candida Stevens to curate the 2022 Platform section. 

Previous editions introduced by Candida have included Threading Forms in 2020 and Folk Art in 2021. 

The range of responses to this theme had been so varied, from a relatively small pool of artists. We had abstract work referencing the riff of jazz music with off-key colour and off kilter form, and abstract pieces referencing movement, kinesthetics, dance, very much in the tradition of music influenced art works, think Mondrian and Klee. We then had figurative artists who are also musicians talking about composition across both art forms, we had outside views of music venues closed during the pandemic, and then work that referenced the sounds around us, ranging from the sound of the funfair to the sounds of nature.

Candida Stevens Gallery specialises in Contemporary British Art with a focus on painting, drawing and textiles. Showcasing Internationally recognised artists and nurturing emerging talent, working with artists who the gallery feels have the skill, determination, enquiry and aptitude to make successful and interesting work. 

Image credit homepage: Celia Cook, Ostinato 31, 2021. Courtesy of Candida Stevens Gallery

PLATFORM

Each year Platform focuses on a single distinct theme, the section includes galleries presenting well-known, overlooked and emerging artists that align to the theme.

Curated by Candida Stevens, for the 2022 Fair, Platform will explore the theme of Music and its part in contemporary visual art.

Music has been inextricably linked to the fashions, expressions and entertainment of mankind since the beginning of time. Music and fine art have borrowed from each other for centuries through a combination of pure inspiration, collaborations and appropriation. Visual art and music are allied in the way their movements are titled and they share terms, like mood, tone, composition. Importantly they share a purpose, to inspire and provoke, both our minds and our mood.

We see music as a significant influence in the history or art. Gustav Klimt praised Schubert, Arnold Schoenberg was inspired by Wassily Kandinsky’s abstract forms, and Morton Feldman worked closely with Mark Rothko. It is affiliated with the rise of modernism and is an inseparable factor in the rise of Pop.

There is plenty of evidence that music and visual art have a long-standing connection and mutual endorsement, which is unsurprising. Across art forms and materials, artists working in various styles refer to the movement, rhythm and other elements of music. Even when visual art and music do not overtly influence one another, they can share abstract qualities without having direct communication. Visual art and music share common cultural influences, including societal, political and technological. With contemporary craft and contemporary art increasingly occupying a shared space in both exhibitions and collections, we look at the range of music inspired visual art being made today.